Executive Chef David Bradley Leaving Lure Atlanta

Chef Bradley in the kitchen at Lure (photo credit: Will Pollock for Stone Four Media)

Chef Bradley in the kitchen at Lure (photo credit: Will Pollock for Stone Four Media)

The very talented executive chef of Lure—part of Fifth Group restaurants—is leaving the restaurant to join Atlanta Neighborhood Charter School as chef and nutrition director. Bradley was quoted within the pages of Pizza for Good, making common-sense suggestions on how to eat fresh and plan ahead when cooking at home. Here’s the passage from the book:

For your Pizza for Good party, try to think of it this way: choose local where it counts, and fill in with readymade items that can make your life a lot easier. There are ways to create an authentic experience pizza experience without killing yourself over the minutiae (see also Chapter XX).

David Bradley, executive chef of Lure in Midtown Atlanta—part of Fifth Group restaurants—urges Pizza for Good readers to build relationships with local purveyors, whether at a green market or another local establishment, to buy local, then fill in where you have to with easy-to-buy stuff.

“Not every single thing on a plate or in a dish has to be 100 percent local for me,” he says. “I’d much rather use a canned tomato than a fresh one, probably nine months out of the year. If I’m going to make sauce I’ll make it with canned tomatoes and then try to buy locally made mozzarella. Or buy some really nice milk and make my own ricotta or something like that.

“You can still have that element and a handmade feel to it, but again it goes back to quality,” he adds. “The ambitious and proper thing would be to make it at home. But that’s probably not most people’s reality.”

And it might not be yours—you can decide that as you go. The main thing to remember is that this is an ambitious project that will suck quite a bit of your time. A labor of love, to be sure, but you can save some energy here and there and still endeavor to search or locally sourced ingredients.

Remember, PFG is way more than a blueprint for building community and fundraising. The book gives you lots of tips on how to cook fresh at home, and make some creative pizzas in the process. Good luck to Chef Bradley!

Decatur’s No. 246: Authentic Italian Farm-to-table Cuisine

No. 246 interior and bar

No. 246 interior and bar

Had a terrific visit today at Decatur, Ga.’s own No. 246, which is part of the Rocket Farm Restaurant Group. We discussed ideas around my upcoming appearance at Decatur Book Festival—but the star of the show was by far the pizza we had.

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as tasty as it was beautiful

I’ll try to do it justice: heirloom mushrooms, roasted Sun Gold tomatoes grown in No. 246’s backyard; dressed arugula with olive oil, lemon and cracked pepper; finished with peaches from Pearson Farm out of Fort Valley, Ga.

The pizza itself had that pitch-perfect finish from the wood-fired oven. A unique flavor unlike anything we could ever do at home, that’s for sure.

No. 246 & Rocket Farm restaurants as a whole have a distinct commitment to farm-to-table eats, which was definitely evident here. I saw fresh basil, parsley and tomatoes growing in abundance in back.

I’ll update as events warrant about any appearance with Chef Andrew during DBF. But today’s experience was memorable in and of itself. Great thanks to Ryan and Valerie for hosting me and allowing me to tell the story of No. 246—an establishment with a real-world practice of fresh and locally derived food.

 

basil plants in the backyard

basil plants in the backyard

 

 

 

 

 

in-house syrups for cocktails

in-house syrups for cocktails