#QuotableMondays: Patricia Arquette Steals the Oscar Evening

You might call it an “Actor’s Barn-burner.”

At last night’s Oscar ceremony, Patricia Arquette won for Best Supporting Actress in a film called “Boyhood.” The film is basically unprecedented in that it was shot over a period of 12 years with the same cast members. (read more)

But it was her speech that charged up the room. She said “the time is now” for wage equality for women in America. Meryl Streep, whom Arquette had just beat in the category, leapt out of her chair as she sat next to a very clap-happy JLo. Not everyone was pleased with her comments, that’s for sure.

The #QuotableMonday moment was not up at the Oscar podium, but rather, something she mentioned on the red carpet: GiveLove.org. She’s spoke passionately about it in a red carpet interview, so I decided to dig a bit deeper. Among many other mission points, the organization advocates and works in developing nations to devise better composting and eco sanitation practices.

The irony, at least to me, is our own situation in this country. We waste a tremendous amount of food, and much of it rots in landfills, which in turn releases methane. From the National Resource Defense Council:

“The average American consumer wastes 10 times as much food as someone in Southeast Asia, up 50 percent from Americans in the 1970s. This means there was once a time when we wasted far less, and we can get back there again. Doing so will ultimately require a suite of coordinated solutions, including changes in supply-chain operation, enhanced market incentives, increased public awareness and adjustments in consumer behavior.

The U.S. government should conduct a comprehensive study for food losses in our food system and establish national goals for food waste reduction. One key action will be to standardize and clarify the meaning of date labels on food so that consumers stop throwing out items due to misinterpretation. A waste reduction organization in the United Kingdom has estimated this type of clarification could prevent about 20 percent of wasted food in households.”

Source: National Resource Defense Council

Source: National Resource Defense Council

Household and business composting would solve a lot of these issues, but we also have to change our behavior and purchase practices as well. I compost at home here in Atlanta and I wish more folks did it, because rotting food waste accounts for nearly 25% of national methane emissions.

For us in a developed nation, few people are talking about food waste and the consequences to us as a society. For developing nations, though, some of the basic things we take for granted like sewers and sanitation don’t exist.

Quoting the group’s mission direct from the GiveLove.org website:

• To introduce low-cost compost toilets in order to reduce disease and provide dignity for people living without basic sanitation
• To reduce reliance on chemical fertilizers by producing organic compost products that can improve soil and improve food security
• To teach people how to compost organic wastes and protect water resources
• To change attitudes about human waste & increase awareness about sustainable land-use practices
• To promote EcoSan and composting as viable solutions to water-based sanitation systems

Pizza for Good is based upon the notion that it’s in our nature to give back—to our communities, to charity or people less fortunate. PFG gives you a fun and effective way to do it, too. So what are you waiting for? buy now

I’m going to have a number of exciting announcements soon, so stay tuned! ❐

Pizza for Good: Buy it for recipes, use it for community

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s